October 18, 2018

Planning for ROI: A CMO's Perspective

Ray Kemper | VP of Marketing, TeamViewer, GreenFig Instructor
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Ray Kemper | VP of Marketing, TeamViewer, GreenFig Instructor

Planning for ROI: A CMO's Perspective

The Chief Marketing Officer(CMO) has become much more than a brand and storytelling guru in the last several years.  The explosive growth of marketing technology, analytical tools and sales enablement resources have added Revenue Strategist and Data Scientist to the CMO required skill set.  Marketing can now drive growth, define and impact the customer experience, as well as enable a competitive edge like never before.  As demand generation and client retention programs grow, strong increases in marketing budgets as a % of revenue have followed.  

Storytelling has always been at the heart of marketing.  Driving the brand story, the value proposition for competitive differentiation, articulating the customer successes and the product benefits, engaging the audiences and motivating the partners and channels have driven businesses forward for decades.  We’ve relied on qualitative stories to justify marketing investment.  The opportunity now is for CMOs is to extend that storytelling to a compelling quantitative and qualitative narrative of revenue impact.  

I’ll be tackling that opportunity in my upcoming GreenFig Course entitled “Planning for ROI: Baseline KPIs for CMO Dashboards”.  CMOs have traditionally struggled to quantify the return of on the marketing spend. Though the struggle continues, we’ve move to a different paradigm where we have strong tools that can help us make better decisions, drive revenue and demonstrate the value of marketing to the business.

In the course, we will discuss:
  • The evolving role of the Chief Marketing Officer and its C-Suite impact
  • The customer lifecycle and Marketing’s unique role in enhancing it
  • Key metrics that a CMO cares about along the customer lifecycle
  • The strategy, categories and content elements of a CMO Dashboard
  • Marketing attribution and challenges to enabling the story of marketing impact

GreenFig’s microeducation degrees are helping to transform the way we learn and grow marketing skill sets.  As business degrees set a foundation of knowledge, GreenFig takes it to the next level with practical, applicable knowledge in digital marketing and business science.  By utilizing executives and practitioners, students get real life knowledge and mentorship in a very fast moving field.  Plus, students build their marketability and network for growing their careers.

This GreenFig course will help take your understanding of marketing impact to a deeper level and showcase the importance of the growing field of marketing insights and analytics.  Data can help with the decision, but it is your skills, experience and a little intuition that will transform those insights into action.  And that is what GreenFig is all about.

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